¡@

China and Global Development Seminar Series

¡@

¡@

¡@

Hong Kong Institute of Economics and Business Strategy

¡@

¡@

presents

¡@

¡@

Diffusing Useful Knowledge while Spreading God's Message:

Protestantism and Economic Prosperity in China 1840-1920
¡@

¡@

¡@

by James Kung

HK University of Science and Technology

 

¡@

April 13, 2011 (Wednesday)

11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

 

Room 910, KKL Building

The University of Hong Kong

Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong

¡@

¡@

¡@

To view Prof. James Kung's presentation slides, please click here.

¡@

¡@

Remarks:  Non-HKU staff/students who are interested in attending this seminar, please register with Ms. Angelina Hung by sending your full name, affiliation and contact details to info@hiebs.hku.hk.  For enquiries, please call 2547 8472. 

¡@

¡@

Abstract

We provide an empirical account of how Protestantism promoted economic prosperity in China¡Xa country Weber ruled out for the development of Protestantism and capitalism. Using county-level data from 1840-1920, a period when China was forced to open up to the West and experienced an early phase of capitalist development, we exploit the outcome of the retreat of missionaries due to the Boxer Uprising to identify the causal effect of the subsequent diffusion of Protestantism on economic outcome. However, we find that the effect of economic prosperity was largest in those counties predominated by the Wesleyans, the Baptists and the Lutherans, who built more primary schools and hospitals and accordingly resulted in a greater diffusion of new corpuses of knowledge, than in counties predominated by the Calvinists¡Xthe denomination that emphasizes the Protestant ethic the most.

¡@

About the Speaker  

Professor James Kung is Professor in the Division of Social Science and Associate Dean in the School of Humanities and Social Science at the Hong Kong University of Science & Technology.  Kung¡¦s recent intellectual interests include a broad range of issues pertaining to the economic history and political economy of China. His current research projects include: the Impact of the West in China¡¦s recent Past; Malthus on China, 1500-1900: An Empirical Test; Genetic Distance, Human Capital and Economic Growth in China: A Long-term Perspective; The Origins of Civil Conflicts in Qing China; and China¡¦s Great Leap Famine, etc. His most recent (including forthcoming) publications can be found in American Political Science Review, Review of Economics and Statistics, Economic History Review, Economic Letters, among others.

¡@

¡@