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China and Global Development Seminar Series

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School of Business

School of Economics and Finance

Hong Kong Institute of Economics and Business Strategy

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jointly present

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Chinaˇ¦s Macro-economy:

Some Important Econometric Models

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by Professor Gregory Chow

Princeton University

 

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February 9, 2011 (Wednesday)

11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

 

Room 910, KKL Building

The University of Hong Kong

Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong

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To view Prof. Gregory Chow's presentation slides, please click here.

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Remarks:  Non-HKU staff/students who are interested in attending this seminar, please register with Ms. Angelina Hung by sending your full name, affiliation and contact details to info@hiebs.hku.hk.  For enquiries, please call 2547 8472. 

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Abstract

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Several important econometric models will be presented to demonstrate that the Chinese macro-economy follows the basic laws of macro-economics.  The models include a model to determine Chinese national income consisting of a consumption function and an investment function, a model to explain inflation, a VAR model to explain the effects of an exogenous change in money supply on aggregate output and the price level and a model to explain economic growth consisting of a production function.

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About the Speaker  (from www.princeton.edu/~gchow)

Gregory Chow served as Chairman of the American Economic Associationˇ¦s Committee on Exchanges in Economics with the People's Republic of China from 1981 to 1994 and as Co-chairman of the U.S. Committee on Economics Education and Research in China with support from the Ford Foundation from 1985 to 1994. He was a member of the U.S.-Hong Kong Economic Co-operation Committee. He advised former Prime Ministers and Chairmen of the Economic Planning and Development Council of the Executive Yuan in Taiwan on economic policy from the mid 1960's to the early 1980's. He was responsible for a three-year program (1984-1986) to teach modern economics in China under the sponsorship of the Chinese State Education Commission (formerly Ministry of Education). He has been appointed Honorary Professor at Fudan , Shandong , the People's , Hainan, Nankai, Huazhong Science and Technology, Guangxi and Zhongshan Universities , and the Chinese Academy of Sciences; Honorary President of Lingnan (University) College. In 1986 , he received an Honorary Doctor's Degree from Zhongshan University , and in 1994 received an LL.D. from Lingnan University in Hong Kong. His book , The Chinese Economy (1985) has been translated into Chinese (Nankai University Press , 1985) and is widely read in China. He has advised the Chinese State Education Commission on economics education in China , the Prime Minister and the State Commission for Restructuring the Economic System on economic reform in China. He is economic advisor to the Shandong Provincial Government and adviser to Chinaˇ¦s Natural Science Foundation.

His publications include fourteen books and over 200 articles. The books include: Demand for Automobiles in the United State: A Study in consumer Durables (North Holland Publishing Company , Amsterdam , 1957); Analysis and Control of Dynamic Economic Systems (John Wiley & Sons , New York , 1975); Econometrics (McGraw-Hill Book Company , New York , 1983); The Chinese Economy (Harper & Row , New York , 1985); Understanding China's Economy (World Scientific Publishing Co. , New Jersey , 1994); Dynamic Economics: Optimization by the Lagrange Method (Oxford University Press , 1997); Economic Transformation (Blackwell Publishers, 2002, 2007), and Knowing China (World Scientific , 2004), and China's Economics Education and Economic Reform (World Scientific, 2007 in Chinese).

At his retirement from Princeton University in 2001 , the Econometric Research Program was renamed the Gregory C Chow Econometric Research Program in his honor.