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China and Global Development Seminar Series

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Hong Kong Institute of Economics and Business Strategy

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presents

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Share of Household Income in China:

Trends and Determinants
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by Prof. Chong-en Bai

Tsinghua University

 

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May 13, 2011 (Friday)

4:30 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.

 

Room 910, KKL Building

The University of Hong Kong

Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong

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To view Prof. Chong-en Bai's presentation slides, please click here.

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Remarks:  Non-HKU staff/students who are interested in attending this seminar, please register with Ms. Angelina Hung by sending your full name, affiliation and contact details to info@hiebs.hku.hk.  For enquiries, please call 2547 8472. 

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Abstract

The paper to be presented investigates the recent trend in the share of household income in China¡¦s national income and attempts to find the reasons behind the trend. We consider the major components of household income, paying particular attention to labor income. We find that the structural transformation from agriculture to non-agriculture is the most important reason behind the trend. The roles of market power and ownership are also considered. We discuss the policy implications of these findings, including the implications on savings and export.

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About the Speaker  

Professor Bai Chong-En is Mansfield Freeman Chair Professor of Economics, Associate Dean, and Chairman of the Economics Department in the School of Economics and Management of Tsinghua University. He is the director of the National Institute for Fiscal Studies at Tsinghua University and a member of the Chinese Economists 50 Forum. He is selected a Cheung Kong Scholar by the Ministry of Education and awarded National Science Fund for Distinguished Young Scholars. He won the Pu Shan-Bank of China best paper award given by China Society of World Economics in 2008, and the Sun Yefang Economic Science Award in 2009. He earned his bachelor degree from University of Science and Technology of China, and his Ph.D degrees in Mathematics and Economics from the University of California, San Diego and Harvard University, respectively. His research interests include economic institutions, public economics, corporate governance, development and transition economics. He has served on the editorial boards of Journal of Comparative Economics, World Bank Economic Review, and China Economic Review, and is a co-editor of China Journal of Economics.



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