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China and Global Development Seminar Series

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Hong Kong Institute of Economics and Business Strategy

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presents

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Economic crisis, labor regulation, and employment in China
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by Professor Albert Park

University of Oxford

 

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April 6, 2011 (Wednesday)

11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

 

Room 910, KKL Building

The University of Hong Kong

Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong

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To view Prof. Albert Park's presentation slides, please click here.

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Remarks:  Non-HKU staff/students who are interested in attending this seminar, please register with Ms. Angelina Hung by sending your full name, affiliation and contact details to info@hiebs.hku.hk.  For enquiries, please call 2547 8472. 

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Abstract

Based on analysis of recent household and firm surveys conducted in China 2010 and 2009, Professor Park assesses how two key recent events--the global financial crisis in late 2008 and the implementation of the new Labor Law in early 2008, have affected employment outcomes in China.  Econometric analysis of panel data on manufacturing firms finds that the new Labor Law led to increased enforcement of labor regulations and reduced employment growth in cities with relatively lax enforcement prior to the Law. 

 

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About the Speaker  

Professor Albert Park is Professor of Economics at the University of Oxford, and a Research Fellow of the Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR) and the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA). He completed his Ph.D. at Stanford in 1996 and was previously an Assistant and Associate Professor of Economics at the University of Michigan. He is a development and labor economist whose research focuses on the Chinese economy. In recent years, he has published papers on migration and poverty, re-employment of dislocated urban workers, rising returns to education, human capital investments (education and health), wage inequality, and the impact of poverty alleviation programs. Currently he co-directs several large-scale household survey projects in China: the China Urban Labor Survey, the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study, and the Gansu Survey of Children and Families. He has consulted for the World Bank on China¡¦s poverty assessment, the impact of education reforms, rural-urban inequality, urban social service provision, and unemployment in China.

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